The Impact of Recent Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics on our Understanding of the Cosmos

D. W. Savin (1) N. S. Brickhouse (2) J. J. Cowan (3) R. P. Drake (4) S. R. Federman (5) G. J. Ferland (6) A. Frank (7) M. S. Gudipati (8) W. C. Haxton (9) E. Herbst (10) S. Profumo (11) F. Salama (12) L. M. Ziurys (13) and E. G. Zweibel (14) ((1)Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University,
New York,  USA (2) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics,  Cambridge, USA (3) Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy,
University of Oklahoma, Norman,  USA (4) Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA (5) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of  Toledo, Toledo,  USA (6) Department of Physics, University of Kentucky, Lexington,  USA (7) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of
Rochester, Rochester,  USA (8) Science Division, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California
Institute of Technology, Pasadena,  USA (9) Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, USA (10) Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy and Physics,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA (11) Department of Physics, ISB 325, University of California,  Santa Cruz,  USA (12) Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field,  USA (13) Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, Arizona Radio Observatory and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona,
Tucson,  USA (14) Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of
Wisconsin, Madison, USA )

An emerging theme in modern astrophysics is the connection between astronomical observations and the underlying physical phenomena that drive our cosmos. Both the mechanisms responsible for the observed astrophysical phenomena and the tools used to probe such phenomena – the radiation and particle spectra we observe – have their roots in atomic, molecular, condensed matter, plasma, nuclear and particle physics. Chemistry is implicitly included in both molecular and condensed matter physics. This connection is the theme of the present report, which provides a broad, though non-exhaustive, overview of progress in our understanding of the cosmos resulting from recent theoretical and experimental advances in what is commonly called laboratory astrophysics. This work, carried out by a diverse community of laboratory astrophysicists, is increasingly important as astrophysics transitions into an era of precise measurement and high fidelity modeling.

Complete preprint ==> http://arxiv.org/abs/1112.2770

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